Tag Archives: physics

Women in STEM Podcast Episode 13 – Pinshane Huang, Materials Research Scientist, Applied Physicist

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Pinshane HuangInterview with Pinshane Huang, who has a phd in applied physics and is a postdoc at Columbia University in the Materials Research Science & Engineering Center. She is a photographer for tiny things.

Hosted by Sarah Worsham.

Music is Light Emotions by MIGmusic.

Listen to Women in STEM podcast Episode 13:


Show Notes

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Women in STEM Podcast Episode 9 – Lauren Aycock, Many-body Physicist

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laurenaycockInterview with Lauren Aycock, Graduate student in Physics at Cornell University & Joint Quantum Institute. Lauren is doing guest research at National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) on many-body physics.

Hosted by Sarah Worsham.

Music is Light Emotions by MIGmusic.

Listen to Women in STEM podcast Episode 9:


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Physics Girl Interviews Emily Calandrelli about The Vomit Comet #WomenInSTEM

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Ever wonder what NASA’s Vomit Comet is like? Wonder what microgravity feels like? Physics Girl interviews Emily Calandrelli who is the host and co-producer of FOX’s Xploration Outer Space. She’s a graduate from MIT and WVU with degrees in aeronautics, astronautics, technology and policy.  Follow Physics Girl on YouTube and Emily at her website.

Learn about the Physics behind Weightless Flight and The Vomit Comet:

Women In STEM Podcast Episode 1 – Katie McGill, Physics PhD Candidate & Creator of The Physics Factor

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Katie_239x239Interview with Katie McGill, Physics PhD Candidate at Cornell University and Creator of the YouTube Channel, The Physics Factor.

Hosted by Sarah Worsham.

Music is Light Emotions by MIGmusic.

Listen to Women In STEM podcast Episode 1:

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Physics as a Gateway to a STEM Career

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English: The Fairy of Eagle Nebula. Français :...

English: The Fairy of Eagle Nebula.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I have always loved science.  My favorite classes throughout elementary, middle and high schools were science classes. I loved watching Cosmos and NOVA and Nature on PBS (which helped quite a bit with the science classes). The same cannot be said of math classes, which were my bane through college (see The Engineer Who Hated Math). Before my Physics classes, I never really saw the impact of science & math together — what a great set of problem solving tools they can be.

Separate, but (Not) Equal

Before Physics, math and science classes were very separate, with very little overlap.  We didn’t really use math in science, or vice versa (science was fairly observational and any math used was pretty simple). Science classes seemed to be about learning about the wonders of the world, while math was just straight-up memorization and busy-work.

Physics as a Gateway

My Physics class was the first time that I think we really did actual problem solving — not for some made-up, ridiculous situations (I’m looking at you, math classes), but for real experiments where we had to figure out what was going on. This required a combination of math, science and creativity. And it was fun! In my physics class, I first started to visualize how you could use science and math knowledge as a career besides just math or science — engineering seemed very doable and approachable, not just about engines. I started dreaming of being an engineer who designed cars.

The Universe Within Reach

My two Physics classes in high school (honors and advanced placement) were some of my favorite classes of my school years.  Even in Engineering school, besides a few awesome Computer Engineering classes, the one Physics class I got to take (I passed out of the others) was a stand-out that weaved together the concepts and equations of time and relativity into something that was almost concrete and definitely was cool. Abstract concepts felt within reach and the universe felt both unimaginably huge and within touch at the same time. What more can you ask of a class?

 

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Women in Science, Interview with Katie McGill, Physics PhD Candidate and Creator of the YouTube Channel, The Physics Factor

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Katie_239x239As cool as physics is, just like any graduate degree, it’s still quite a bit of work to get.  Add in creating YouTube videos about the field you love, and what Katie McGill does is pretty amazing.  Today she shares her story with us, not only about being a physics PhD candidate, but also about creating videos for her YouTube Channel, The Physics Factor. Continue Reading →